Copyright Suggestions – Edhero

Copyright Suggestions – Edhero

The information in this book is based on research and should not considered as a legal advice. We want you to be protected and want you to succeed without hiccups and so we did quite a bit of research on this topic to provide you some very useful suggestions. You need to consult a lawyer if you need legal advice related to your products. If you need copyright, trademark registration help then let us know and we will get one of our lawyers help you out.

What is a Copyright?

Simply put, copyright is a form of protection that gives you ownership over the things you create including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. The protection is valid for both published and unpublished works.

Copyright holders, and those they authorize, have several rights afforded to them, including:

  • Public display or performance of work.
  • Reproduce the entire work or parts of it.
  • Distribute copies of the work.
  • Derive works, such as translations or dramatizations.

Here are few questions you need to ask yourself before you use someone else’s work in your product

Is it in the public domain?

Works in the public domain are those whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired, have been forfeited, or are inapplicable. Here is a quick link to read more about public domain

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_domain

If you think the work you are going to use falls under public domain then you are good to go and can use it without any worries.

Is it under creative commons?

Creative Commons are form of licenses that people use to legally share their work with the public. There are six main licenses offered when someone choose to publish their work with creative commons license.  Each license has its own restriction and its own terms of usage.

  • Attribution (by) :

All CC licenses require that others who use your work in any way must give you credit the way you request, but not in a way that suggests you endorse them or their use. If they want to use your work without giving you credit or for endorsement purposes, they must get your permission first.

  • ShareAlike (sa) :

You let others copy, distribute, display, perform, and modify your work, as long as they distribute any modified work on the same terms. If they want to distribute modified works under other terms, they must get your permission first.

  • NonCommercial (ca):

You let others copy, distribute, display, perform, and (unless you have chosen NoDerivatives) modify and use your work for any purpose other than commercially unless they get your permission first.

  • NoDerivatives (nd):

You let others copy, distribute, display and perform only original copies of your work. If they want to modify your work, they must get your permission first.

You can read more on https://creativecommons.org/

So, as long as the license allows you to use the work commercially you are good to go.

Is it possible to claim fair use?

Fair Use is the concept that if you are doing something for the greater good of society, like teaching, then your needs supersede the ownership rights of the copyright holder under the Copyright Act. Teachers, and by association, students, can legally use music, websites, video, print, images, and the whole realm of copyrighted materials for the purposes of teaching.

use a checklist similar to the one below to determine if your use can be considered as fair. Also, remember in case if a publisher believes you are infringing, fair use can only be determined by a court of law.

How can I ask for permission if I want to?

Usually, many educational publishers will have a form for you to ask for permission on their websites. You can also use a contact form on their website to ask for copyright permissions. Moreover, if you don’t see a contact form then you can look under the terms of Use and copyright policy documents to learn more about their usage restrictions.

Some additional resources
  1. http://www.pbssocal.org/education/teachers/copyright/
  2. https://www.auburn.edu/citizenship/copyright_for_teachers.html
  3. https://www.ocps.net/lc/east/htc/mediacenter/Documents/FairUse.pdf
  4. http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/curr280.shtml
Fair Use Cheat Sheet
Work  Fair Use Violation
Poem · Single copy for teacher use.

· One copy per student, provided material is brief, spontaneously copied, and meets the four fair use considerations.

· Students and teachers may incorporate text into multimedia projects.

· Multiple copies allowed of a complete poem, up to 250 words — no more than two printed pages.

· Multiple copies of up to 250 words from longer poems.

· Copyright and attribution provided

· Copies used multiple times without permission, not to exceed nine occurrences per class term.

· Copies made with the intent to avoid purchase of the selected work.

Chapter of a book · Single copy for teacher use.

· One copy per student, provided material is brief, spontaneously copied, and meets the four fair use considerations.

· Students and teachers may incorporate text into multimedia projects.

· Copyright and attribution provided.

· Copies used multiple times without permission, not to exceed nine occurrences per class term.

· Copies made with the intent to avoid purchase of the selected work.

· Workbooks and consumables may not be copied.

Prose, short story, web, newspaper, or magazine article · Single copy for teacher use.

· One copy per student, provided material is brief, spontaneously copied, and meets the four fair use considerations.

· Copies of complete work of less than 2,500 words and excerpts up to 1,000 words or 10% of work, whichever is less. · For works of 2,500-4,999 words, 500 words may be copied.

· Students and teachers may incorporate text into multimedia projects.

· Copyright and attribution provided.

· Copies used multiple times without permission.

· Copies made with the intent to avoid purchase of the selected work.

Artwork or graphic image · Five images, or fewer, of an artist/photographer in one program or printing and not more than 10% or 15% of images from published collective work, whichever is less.

· Copyright and attribution provided.

· Alteration of image into another form, for other than temporary purposes.
Video · The material must be legitimately acquired or purchased by the school.

· Must be for instructional classroom use, not entertainment.

· Clips used in a multimedia presentation may be 10% or three minutes, whichever is less.

· Copyright and attribution provided.

· Multiple copies prohibited.

· Alteration of video into another form, for other than temporary purposes.

· The video must be a legitimate copy, not rented or bootleg.

Music · Clips used in a multimedia presentation may be 10% of a composition.

· Copyright and attribution provided.

· Alteration of composition into another form, for other than temporary purposes.

· Multiple copies prohibited.

Broadcast television shows (not cable) · Single copy of broadcast may be made, but shown to multiple teachers.

· Copy should be shown during the first ten days from air date, up to forty-five days after recording date.

· Copyright notice required.

· PBS offers extended recording rights of up to one year on most programs.

· May not be altered.

· May not be recorded at the request of an administrator or district.

· Multiple copies prohibited.

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